New Photo Show: "From Darkness to Light" Spotlights Photographers Confronting Mental Illness

by JamesNYCAugust 2. 2014 09:46

Rachael Talibart, Into The Mist (2012) Digital photograph, 18" x 12" Edition 1 of 10

An inspiring new photo show explores how photographers confront and, in many cases, overcome depression and mental illness through creating images. Founded in 2012, the Broken Light Collective provides photographers of all skill levels, who are affected by mental health challenges, with a safe and supportive environment in which to display and develop their work.

Alyson Vega, My Enduring Rusty Pier (2011) Digital photograph, 8" x 10" Edition 1 of 10

The new show, titled From Darkness to Light: Photographs by Broken Light Collective, includes selections from the group, which is comprised of over 10,000 photographers from more than 150 countries. The 36 photographers featured in the exhibition come from all over the globe and have been affected by a range of conditions including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, PTSD, OCD, addiction, and autism.

The goal of the group, according to a recent story in the New York Times, is to use the art of photography as an effective means to fight the stigma and raise public awareness while enhancing the lives of those affected by mental illness.

From Darkness to Light is curated by Danielle Hark and presented through the Fountain Gallery Visiting Artists Program.

The show is on display at the Fountain Gallery, Fountain Gallery, 702 Ninth Avenue in New York City until August 13th.

More info and image here.

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Photographing Police Is Legal in Texas, Too, Judge Rules in First Amendment Case

by JamesNYCJuly 29. 2014 10:28

A federal court judge in Texas has rejected an argument that the right to photograph or videotape police officers “is not recognized as a constitutional right,” clearing the way for a citizen’s civil rights claim against the City of Austin, its police chief, and various Austin police officers.

“The First Amendment protects the right to videotape police officers in the performance of their official duties, subject to reasonable time, place and manner restrictions,” U.S. Magistrate Judge Mark Lane wrote in the decision handed down last week.

The judge also rejected an argument by the defendants that they should be immune from prosecution in the case because the right to photograph police officers performing their duties was not clearly established when they arrested the plaintiff on three separate occasions.

“A robust consensus of circuit courts of appeals that have addressed this issue have concluded that the First Amendment encompasses a right to record public officials as they perform their official duties,” the judge wrote, citing several right-to-record decisions favorable to plaintiffs from around the country.

The plaintiff in the Texas case, Antonio Buehler, was first arrested on January 1, 2012, when he photographed two Austin police officers engaged in a traffic stop in a parking lot. Buehler was refueling his truck nearby when he heard one of the officers yelling, then saw a passenger of the stopped vehicle being “yanked violently” out of the car and thrown to the ground.

Mr. Buehler started taking pictures from a distance, and asked the officers why they were abusing the passenger, according to court papers. One of the officers approached Buehler and arrested him for “resisting arrest, search or transportation” after accusing Buehler of spitting on him, according to court documents.

Buehler filed a complaint with the police, but he alleges that no action was taken. He ended up forming an organization called Peaceful Streets Project to help inform people about their rights “and hold law enforcement accountable.” The organization now routinely video records police officers to prevent and document police brutality, according to court papers.

Mr. Buehler was subsequently arrested for recording the arrest of a man in downtown Austin on August 26, 2012. He was arrested a third time about a month later, also for video recording police performing their duties. Both times he was charged with Interference with Public Duties.

In response, Antonio Buehler sued for violation of his First and Fourteenth Amendment rights. He also alleged false arrest, excessive force, unlawful search and seizure, and malicious prosecution.

In addition to refusing the city’s motion to throw out Buehler’s federal civil rights claims, Judge Lane sustained his claim for false arrest; his claim that the city and its police chief failed to establish a policy, train, and supervise city police officers about the rights of individuals to record police; and his various state law claims.

But the judge dismissed parts of Buehler’s lawsuit, including claims for malicious prosecution and excessive force, because Buehler’s allegations didn’t meet the legal standards required to sustain those claims.

The ruling was not a final decision on the merits of Buehler’s claims. Instead, it cleared the way for Buehler to continue pursuing the surviving claims.

 

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Pentax Unveils Limited Edition K-3 DSLR

by JamesNYCJuly 28. 2014 17:56

To celebrate its flagship K-3 digital SLR, Pentax announced last week that they would ship a limited edition version in gunmetal gray to dealers in August. They'll also sell the K-3 online at www.us.ricoh-imaging.com.

Only 2,000 such models will be sold and the kit will include the K-3 body, the BG-5 battery grip in matching gunmetal gray, an exclusive black leather strap and a pair of batteries that can be used in the camera body or the grip. You'll pay $1,399 for the honor of owning this limited edition K-3, which is $100 above the standard K-3's MSRP.

The K-3 was announced to the world in October 2013 and sports a 24-megapixel APS-C-sized sensor, a 27-point AF system and high-speed shooting at 8.3 frames per second (fps). It does not use an anti-aliasing (AA) filter but instead features an AA simulator, allowing you to select whether you want filtering turned on or off.

 

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7 Great Camera Rigs for Different Gigs

by JamesNYCJuly 28. 2014 10:33

Yes, your camera can shoot high-def video (or even 4K). No, you can’t simply hit the record button and expect to get professional-looking results. In particular, that high-resolution footage is going to look extremely shaky if you plan to handhold your HD-DSLR for more than just a few seconds. To capture crisp, steady clips, you’ll need to attach your camera to a rig or stabilizer. Rigs have come a long way from those clumsy, cumbersome setups of just a few years ago. Here are our current favorites for a range of cameras and assignments.

READ THE FULL STORY AT PDN

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The road ahead for V System photographe

by JamesNYCJuly 23. 2014 08:00

Yesterday meets today and is ready for tomorrow.
Hasselblad has gone back to the future with its new CFV-50c digital back for V System photographers worldwide.

 

 

CFV 50C DATASHEET

The CFV-50c comes with a cutting edge CMOS sensor (just like its H5D-50c sibling) offering photographers outstanding performance at all ISO settings.

Now dedicated V System users – even those with cameras going back as far as 1957 – have access to the very latest imaging technology from the world’s leading medium format camera maker, but can still revere and cherish V System classic design and feel.

The CFV-50c celebrates almost sixty years of V System history but now offers users instant access to the revelations of today’s progressive imaging environment.

Photographers can now embrace the wealth and bandwidth of latest photo know-how and employ it with ease to fully exploit the potential for their older cameras.  Breathtaking results from a world-beating digital back.

It’s Hasselblad genius at your fingertips.

The check list:

  • CMOS sensor with the same performance level as the H5D-50c (perfect colours in any light).
  • Long exposures with clean, noise-free images.
  • Classic design (similar to the old film magazine).
  • Simple operation with no need for external cables (the CFV is the only digital back to offer this for V cameras).
  • Allows for use of PM90 and PME90 90º viewfinders.
  • Live Video in Phocus in colour.
  • New larger LCD screen with higher resolution.
  • Remote control option from Phocus.
  • Classic Hasselblad square crop option.
  • Modernised user interface

 

Technical

Sensor type: CMOS

Sensor size: 50 Mpixels (8272 x 6200 pixels)

Sensor dimensions: 43.8 x 32.9 mm

Image size: RAW 3FR capture 65 MB on average. Tiff 8 bit 154 MB

Capture rate: 1.5 capture/sec. 35 captures/ minute (based on a SanDisk Extreme UDMA7 120 MB/s) 

Single shot

16 bit colour

ISO 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200 & 6400

Longest shutter speed: 12 minutes

Image storage: CF card type II (write speed >20 MB/sec) or tethered to Mac or PC

Color management: Hasselblad Natural Colour Solution - One generic profile 

Storage capacity: On average 60 images on a 4GB CF card

Battery type: Sony™ InfoLithium L NP-F series

Colour display: 3.0 inch TFT type, 24 bit colour

Histogram feedback: Yes

IR filter: Mounted on sensor

Feedback: IAA - Instant Approval Architecture: provides acoustic and visual feedback

File format: Lossless compressed Hasselblad 3F RAW 

Software: Phocus for Mac and PC (included)

3FR files are also supported directly in Apple and Adobe environments

Macintosh: OSX version 10.5 or later. PC: Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 (32 and 64 bit), Windows 8

Camera support: Hasselblad V System cameras manufactured since 1957. 2000 series cameras and 201F with C lenses only. 202FA / 203FE and 205FCC camera models need a minor camera modification to use F/FE lenses. All other cameras with Hasselblad V interface.

Host connection type: FireWire 800 (IEEE1394b)

Battery capacity: Sony™ InfoLithium L, up to 8 hours of shooting capacity

Operating temperature: 0 - 45 °C / 32 - 113 °F

Dimensions: 91 x 92 x 57 mm [W x H x D]

Weight: 530 g (Excluding battery and CF card)

Package contents: Hasselblad CFV digital back with protective cover, adapter cables,  FireWire cable and 16 GB CF card. Focusing Screen (Split image / Micro Prism) with dual format markings.

 

 

 

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The Grim Realities of Reality TV: Workers Speak

by JamesNYCJuly 19. 2014 09:52

The rise of reality TV programming over the past two decades has been driven in large part by the fact that reality shows are cheap to produce. Labor costs are a big reason why. What does that mean for the people who work on these shows? Allow some of them to tell you.

Last week, a union that is working with employees of reality (or news/ nonfiction) television shows put us in contact with a number of people who were willing to share their stories of working in the industry. These workers have varying experiences, but they all presumably share the conviction that a union would improve their working conditions. You are free to decide whether or not that colors your view of their stories. Many of these employees are treated as freelancers, and they do not have the workplace protections that their unionized brethren in other sectors of the entertainment industry enjoy. Their experiences vary, but they all go to show that, past a thin veneer of glamour, the TV industry is just another job.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE

 

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The most important and spot on advice any new or existing photographer could ever learn

by JamesNYCJuly 17. 2014 11:10

Greg Heisler Talks Photography as a Career and Having ‘True’ Style

The advice given in this video by Gregory Heisler is so dead on it should be required viewing

 

Gregory Heisler from Maine Media Workshops + College on Vimeo.

As much information as we’re able to pull in through the Internet, there is one thing that can never be obtained through words or pictures on a screen: experience. Through time and experience, information turns to knowledge, and we begin to wrap our heads around the complicated concepts that baffled us in the beginning.

One phenomenal example of a man who has accrued more experience than most is renowned portrait photographer Gregory Heisler, and in the interview above with Maine Media Workshops + College, he shares valuable insight and advice for photographers both young and old.

Heisler starts off with a funny, profound and very relatable event that took place when he was a young photography student in college. From there, he goes on to share some valuable pieces of knowledge he’s gained throughout his career, covering everything from business to ‘true’ style in that concise and focused manner all his own.

At five-and-a-half minutes long, it’s a quick watch that will enrich your day and, quite possibly, your career as a photographer. Be sure to give it a watch or toss it in your queue so you don’t miss out.

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Elephant Steady camera stabilizer uses iPhone gyro to stay on the level

by JamesNYCJuly 16. 2014 02:12

This is a Kickstarter campaign we like.

One of the neat things about smartphones is the fact that when gadgets are designed to be used with them, those devices can make use of the phone's sensors and other electronics instead of incorporating their own.

 

This, of course, means that those devices can thus be smaller and cheaper than would otherwise be possible. The Elephant Steady is a new motorized iPhone camera-stabilizing rig, that takes this approach.

More...

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RØDE Announces the iXY Microphones for iPhone 5, 5s and 5c

by JamesNYCJuly 13. 2014 02:45

 

The iXY with Lightning connector features a matched pair of ½ inch condenser capsules arranged in a stacked X-Y configuration, with on-board high-fidelity analogue to digital conversion. This ensures accurate, immersive and true to life stereo recordings.

The iXY with Lightning connector provides broadcast quality audio in your pocket, everywhere. Perfect for meetings, reporting, recording music and used on-camera you won't leave home without it.

Interchangeable rubber mounting clamps are supplied to suit both iPhone 5/5s and 5c, which also provide shock mounting and help to minimise vibration transferring to the microphone capsules. A foam windshield for outdoor recording and protective storage pouch are also included.

The RØDEGrip mount is optionally available for mounting the iXY and iPhone on a camera or microphone stand, and a "deadcat" windshield for high wind conditions will be available shortly.

RØDE Rec also recently received an update to increase compatibility and stability on the iOS 7 platform and are available to download in the App Store.

Visit www.ixymic.com for more information

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David Bailey: “How are you going to cross the road?”

by JamesNYCJuly 12. 2014 05:40

 

Mr. Bailey, would you swear in front of the Queen?

No, if you’re going to accept the Queen you have to accept the tradition. You know, I’ve got nothing against monarchy. I think there are too many hangers-on, but that’s also a cliché thing to say. I doubt she’d be too shocked. She’s been around; she’s not stupid.

You recently took the official photo for her 88th birthday.

Yes and I think she looks incredible for 88. I had never photographed her before.

Why not?

I wouldn’t photograph anybody if they only give you five minutes. I don’t care who it is. I don’t care if God phoned me up and said, “I want a picture, I’ve only got five minutes.” I’d say, “Well, work some of your magic and make it longer!” Even though I’m actually quicker than most and I usually get bored before they get bored.

What kind of people are the most difficult to photograph?

Lots of politicians are so full of themselves. Sports people too a bit. But actors are the most difficult because you never know who you’re photographing. They could be Hamlet or Lassie. But the fewer people they come with, the more interesting they usually are. Johnny Depp came with nobody so I knew it was going to be all right. Jack Nicholson never came with anybody, but Jack’s different because I’ve known him for so long.

 You once said Jack Nicholson is the smartest actor because he knows something nobody else does. What is it that he knows?

I don’t fucking know. If I knew, I’d be as smart as him. (Laughs)

One of the things that fascinated me when I met him was his grin and the sparkle in his eye when he talked about women.

Yeah, with Viagra. He’s the first person that told me about Viagra.

When was that?

Oh, years ago. Before everyone knew about it! (Laughs)

When you know someone very well like you do Jack Nicholson is it easier to take a great portrait of them?

It depends. It’s one of those abstract things. We had a difficult bloke this week, what was he called? Van Morris or somebody… He was so grumpy. But I loved him being grumpy because I could use his grumpiness. I got a great grumpy picture out of him. If I see another picture of a rock ‘n’ roller against some graffiti… It drives you mad, the same old picture! Can’t they ever think of something different to do? So I don’t mind people that are difficult. I quite like that. It amuses me because there is always a way around it. I mean, no one could be more difficult than Van whatever he’s called, Van Morrison.

It seems pointless to have your picture taken if you’re not going to cooperate though.

Well he left really happy, Van Morrison. But it is kind of pointless to come here if you’re not going to help me. They might not like the picture, but one day they will. One day that’s what they’re going to look like – whether they look like that or not. Medici said to Michelangelo, “That sculpture doesn’t look like me.” Michelangelo said, “Listen, you’ll be dead in 20 years, but this will be around for 2,000 years. So, that’s what you look like!” You could say that a bit with photography.

Does it often happen that people aren’t happy with their portrait, but then years later change their mind?

Yeah. 10 years later usually. We had one recently, I won’t mention his name, I shot him 30 years ago and he said, “I hate the picture.” But his wife bought one for him as a birthday present recently. (Laughs) 30 years later and come get the picture.

Are celebrities more difficult nowadays than they were 30 or 40 years ago?

Well, I avoid celebrities. I’m not really interested in people that come with PR. That’s probably why I can’t work in America, because I don’t take all that bullshit. I don’t know how people like Bruce Weber manage, because it would drive me mad. All these silly people who don’t know anything that come with celebrities and try to tell you what to do. It’s madness! They brought it on themselves, the magazines. They should have been stricter. They should have said, “No, we’re not showing you. We’re doing the interview and that’s that.” But instead they pander to them and in the end they end up owning you. Those magazines are owned by the celebrities, really.

You don’t strike me as the type to pander to anyone.

I never really read what people write about me, but the comments people made when doing this exhibition recently at the National Portrait Gallery are so stupid. “Oh, Bailey panders to these people.” I don’t pander to anybody. I just do the picture I do. I don’t care who it is. And I won’t do pictures if people want approval. It has always seemed stupid to me that they ask you to do something and then want to sort of tell you how to do it. What madness!

What about magazines?

In fact, the magazines only get one image. If they don’t like it, then either I say to them, “I have another one,” or else, “Forget it, don’t publish it.”

Does that limit the number of magazines you work with today?

I don’t work for American Vogue anymore, for example. I’m great mates with Anna, I’ve known her for years, but it’s not a question of friendship. It’s just that I don’t do what she wants and she doesn’t do what I want.

Is it impossible for you to collaborate with people that are not exactly on your wavelength?

They’re not even allowed to come on the set when I shoot, not the art director or the stylist or anyone. I’ve always been a bit like that. I remember British Vogue blackmailed photographers in the early days to get them to do what they wanted. They would say, “Well if you don’t sign a contract, you can’t work for us.” And since there was nobody else to work for in England at that moment, you didn’t really have an option. So I’m not very fond of the business people at Condé Nast. I’ve got nothing against the editors and the people that work there, but I think that the business people are less than… modern. (Laughs) I don’t know where they’re coming from! It’s like leftover from a bygone age.

It’s surprising that so much politics are involved in an industry that’s supposed to be so creative.

Well Vogue will destroy itself if it goes on like that because everything that’s run by accountants eventually vanishes up its own ass. The only reason I did fashion in the first place was because I thought, “If I’m going to do photography my way, the only way to be creative and get paid is to do fashion.” So I stopped doing it in the ’80s when I started directing more and more commercials.

How do you pick the people that you take portraits of?

I’m only interested in what I’m interested in.The rest just sort of happened that way. I mean, I knew Mick before he was anybody really, when he was still at the London School of Economics. So that’s another accident in my life, that Mick happened to be a good mate.

You seem to have had all kinds of accidents happen to you. Didn’t Freddie Mercury stick his tongue down your throat during the 1985 Live Aid concert?

Yeah he did. Him and Terry Richardson’s father, they’re the only two men who’ve managed to get their tongues in my mouth! (Laughs)

How many have tried?

Oh, lots. Once I was just in the club and I said, “Who is this old fuck who keeps buying me scotch and sodas?” And they said, “Oh, that’s Francis Bacon.” (Laughs) I didn’t know who Francis Bacon was! But I always took it as a compliment. These silly people that say, “Oh, I was sexually assaulted because somebody grabbed my ass in a gay club.” What are you doing in a gay club?

It’s like going to the pool and complaining that you got wet.

True, if you don’t get your ass grabbed, there’s probably something wrong with you. Take it as an enjoyment! If you don’t like it, don’t go to gay clubs! Fucking idiots. I mean, when I was at school I had teachers try to kiss me all the time, so don’t tell me. It’s all bullshit. If you can’t handle that, then how are you going to get through the rest of life? How are you going to cross the road?

Have you always had a bit of a temper?

Well, that’s a funny story… During the war we got bombed and our flat was so destroyed that we had to move to the countryside. One time two boys said to me, “Would you like a blackberry?” and I said, “Yeah.” So they gave me a blackberry. And they said, “Do you want another one?” I said, “Yeah, it was nice.” And they gave me another one and said, “Did you like that?” I said, “Yes.” And they said, “Well, we peed on those.” So when they had gone I set fire to their fucking field. (Laughs)

How old were you?

About five. Five and a half maybe.

 

 VIA THE TALK

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